10D9N India Day 8 : New Delhi Women Metro, Qutub Minar, Hauz Khas, Yellow Jar, India Gate, Angan, Bikanervala

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Arrived in The Yellow Jar, a highly recommended restaurant by the locals in the Hauz Khas market area.

Yellow Jar’s address.

Vivian checking out the home delivery leaflet.

The menu. Prices aren’t as cheap as what we’ve been used to for the last few days but still ok.

Wall decorations.

Pinboard.

The drink on my left was a masala coke and the one on the right was called The Yellow Jar Refreshing Drink. Vivian and I liked them very much!

Shammi kebabs.

With onions and mint sauce.

Chicken briyani.

Curry. All dishes were recommended by the owner himself.

The owner of Yellow Jar who said he was a cricket player. Tried googling his name but came up with nothing.

04.25 pm – Walked to the nearby Hauz Khas Village, a designer boutique and restaurant hub.

Walked by the grandmother granddaughter tombs also known as Dadi-Poti tombs. Nobody knows who’s buried inside till today.

So is the case too for Chhoti Gumti.

Passed by an Indian temple made out of white marbles.

04.45 pm – Arrived at the entrance to Hauz Khas Village.

No one will ever name their shop ‘Maati’ in Malaysia cause ‘mati’ means death.

Sneaking in a shot before being stopped by security. Funny thing is, I thought that you didn’t have to get permission to take photographs of parts of buildings that belonged in the public domain. ‘Apala’ is a common gesture in Malaysia for expressing disappointment.

Kunzum Travel Cafe, a well known hangout place for people who travel. As I thought it was a restaurant, we didn’t enter seeing that we’ve just come from Yellow Jar with a full stomach.

Houses with the name of the owner at the front.

Hi Jaagmal!

As we continued further in, the road began to look less proper and paved. We knew we were lost.

05.02 pm – Somehow, we ended up in Hauz Khas Complex, a place that had a water tank, an Islamic seminary, a mosque, a tomb and pavilions built around an urbanized village with medieval history traced to the 13th century of Delhi Sultanate reign.

Vivian was in deep thought about her life.

So was doggy.

Using fear to keep the village car park in order.

05.23 pm – Hopped into the tuktuk to take us to Hauz Khas Metro.

Actually, the accessibility of Delhi’s metro is poor. You’d still have to take a tuktuk to reach your destination.

Sometimes, it might be easier to skip the metro and just use the tuktuk.

05.59 pm – Arrived in Gandhi Smrti an hour too late. 🙁

Hey, badminton! My favourite type of sport!

Continued on walking to India Gate.

06.36 pm – About half an hour later, we arrived at India Gate. As it was in the open, the wind was considerably strong and it was so cold!

07.01 pm – Walked all the way to the next metro located half an hour away from India Gate. Didn’t take any tuktuks to fetch us to Central Secretariat metro station because they were all asking for exorbitant fares.

At last, we arrived but our feet hurt like hell.

One thing good about the metro in India is that all first coach are reserved for women only.

Not a single man in sight.

We were horrified when we arrived in Rajiv Chowk. It was soooOOOoooooo crowded! We had to wait for 3 trains to pass by before we could board!

Made a stop by Big Apple minimarket nearby Karol Bagh metro station.

Water supply for the next few days.

Poor Vivian and her bruised feet. 🙁 Damn you Delhi government, for not building metro stations closer to tourist attractions!

10.11 pm – Went to check out Bikanervala, a famous chain of Indian sweets and snack shop.

What actually interested us was Angan, Bikanervala’s value for money vegetarian restaurant.

It has the entire India under one roof. Be it south or north Indian cuisine, they have it here.

The self service counter where you order and collect your food.

We had curry peas.

Garlic parantha.

Plain tosai.

And chow mien again. Lol.

Dinner was lovely.

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